Category Archives: Preserving Easton

18-22 SOUTH PARK AVE-FOREVER YOURS OR FOREVER GONE….

Click below to see our view of why we should retain this property as open space. It is the reason why Citizens for Easton was formed, and why Bill Kupinse was so passionate about keeping the property for present and future generations.

PLEASE SIGN “PETITION” TO SAVE SOUTH PARK PROPERTY

Petition may be signed online at https://www.facebook.com/citizensforeaston/posts/2835548526699186

You may also sign at Greiser’s Coffee & Market, or email us at cfe@citizensforeaston.org, and a Board member will swing by to obtain your signature.

For more information, click below to see letter to selectmen dated April 28, 2021.

BILL KUPINSE – ORAL HISTORY WITH DOLLY CURTIS

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FORUM ON ZONING MOVING TO HARTFORD- TONIGHT @ 6PM

On the shirt tails of our referendum yesterday regarding the sidewalk, please join this informative forum this evening. Many issues that are on the table for discussion may be a jumping off point for why the sidewalks are becoming first and foremost at the forefront now.
Join us for a virtual forum on zoning changes that will affect your home and your town:
Date: Wed. March 31, 2021
Time: 6PM – 7:30 PM
Zoning, Land Use Issues & What is at Stake
Place: Please be sure to register here:

www.eventbrite.com/e/zoning-land-use-issues-whats-at-stake-for connecticut-tickets-148291549015
Here’s why:
A dozen bills are proposed in Hartford that if passed will restrict your local zoning board’s authority to regulate land use without considering the uniqueness of each of our 169 towns in Connecticut.


Zoning boards must be able to rule based on local criteria like location, topography, flooding, traffic, parking, environmental issues, wildlife, open space, historic preservation, infrastructure capacity and what is already built nearby.
The panel includes State Rep. Kimberly Fiorello, Sherman First Selectman Don Lowe, Woodstock TPZ Chairman Dr. Jeffery Gordon, Kathryn Braun, Esq. TPZ Commissioner Fairfield, and Steven Mullins TPZ Commissioner West Haven.


HOSTED BY: CT169Strong.org

MOREHOUSE FIELDS PUBLIC INFORMATION MEETING MARCH 18, 2020-7:30 pm

There will be a public information meeting March 18, 2020 in the Easton Library Community Room  at 7:30 pm to discuss the Letter of Intent from Sacred Heart University to build a Sports Complex on Easton’s Morehouse Road fields adjacent to Samuel Staples Elementary School.

Letter of Intent Attached

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LETTER FROM CONCERNED RESIDENT

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Join Citizens for Easton

Please click here to become part of Citizens for Easton today!

Join the flock! 🙂

SADDLE RIDGE UPDATE

When: Thursday December 5, 2019 @ 11 AM.
Where: Hartford Judicial District, 95 Washington St
Why: It is important to show Judge Berger that Easton residents care enough about the safety of the public drinking water supply to drive up to Hartford and observe the proceedings!

 

🚗 Please contact us if you want to share a ride!

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👋 The motion to re-argue has, of course, resulted in *additional attorney’s fees*. We would appreciate any contribution you can make to our efforts in opposing Saddle Ridge.

Contribute

👫 You may contribute by donating via Paypal here:

 

If you would like to pay by check, please mail to:

Citizens for Easton
PO Box 151

Easton, CT  06612

Thank you! Hope to see you there!

SADDLE RIDGE

PRESS RELEASE                                                                     OCTOBER 5, 2019

  The Connecticut State Superior Court in Hartford ruled Thursday that a cluster housing application known as Saddle Ridge, or Easton Crossing, be remanded back to Easton’s Planning and Zoning Commission because it failed to require an assessment by Easton’s Conservation Commission when it approved the application.

In the 32-page memorandum, the Court ruled that Easton’s Planning and Zoning Commission was in violation of various statutes when it approved the 2016 application for 30 single family homes and 18 duplexes. Consequently, the Court held Planning and Zoning must “refer the application to [Conservation] for consideration as discussed herein.”

The decision was a victory for Citizens for Easton, whose corollary organization, Coalition to Save Easton, has battled Saddle Ridge’s various cluster housing applications over the past decade. Those were not only in violation of Easton’s long-standing zoning laws, but if successful, would have posed an immediate threat to the public watershed.

In a statement, the CFE board said, “We thank the Court for its careful consideration of this vitally important matter, and are gratified that the court also agreed that P&Z had acted illegally when it approved the application without first requiring Saddle Ridge to make the required application to Conservation. Easton’s Conservation Commission is specifically charged to appraise any application’s impact on the watershed. We continue to believe this application, if successful, will have a profoundly deleterious effect on the public watershed. Moreover, it will set the precedent for other developments of this scale and impact.

“Since CFE and CSE first challenged this assault on the wetlands over a decade ago, we have maintained that any application which potentially threatens the wetlands is a matter of public health. Easton has a unique role in Fairfield County, as steward of a resource that serves over half a million people. We will continue to pursue an outcome consistent with that mandate.”

The Court, however, did not agree with CFE and CSE, that the septic systems as proposed by the developer would be in direct violation of Easton’s ordinance against community septic systems, referring to letters from Easton’s public health officer and director.

Therefore, the Court ruled that our appeal of the application “is remanded in part and denied in part.”

In a statement, the CFE board said, “We’re disappointed that the Court did not rule in our favor on this matter, but we continue to believe that the septic systems as proposed would be in direct violation of ordinance barring community septic systems.

Notwithstanding this victory, CFE has found it necessary to move to reargue two parts of the decision. First, we are asking that the court reconsider its decision that the septic systems as proposed do not violate the ordinance because the court, in ruling as it did, accepted the opinion of a state official which cannot override the town ordinance. Second, we are asking that the court reconsider its instruction to have P&Z refer the application to Conservation because we believe that the court should have just granted our appeal.

“Once again, to restate our position, which has not wavered since we first took up this fight: This application seeks to overturn any number of long standing measures that were put in place to preserve the watershed and the reservoirs. It has sought to undercut those by throwing smokescreens over them, with intent to confuse and obfuscate. Their proposed multi-dwelling septic system proposals are but one example. Easton’s Planning & Zoning Commission regrettably has been duped. CFE/CSE has not. We will continue to pursue this matter as well. “